Can I Give My Dog Bread?

Can I Give My Dog Bread?Your best buddy likely knows what bread is since almost all households eat their fair share. Obviously this staple food isn’t dangerous for dogs. There are, however, downsides to consider before sharing several slices with a precious pet.

Most dogs would gladly wolf down any kind of bread that you have to offer them. But you should be more strategic about what goes in their stomach. This food amounts to filler because it’s mostly devoid of nutritional value.

Bread is also loaded with too many carbohydrates which doesn’t make sense for canines. It’s best to not allow your dog to munch on this filler food, especially on a regular basis. Sharing some isn’t terrible but keep it to a minimum.

Can I Give My Dog Bread? Answer: On occasion but not often

It’s best to avoid regularly providing this food. It can easily be habit forming.

Regular plain old bread isn’t harmful for dogs. That said, it’s basically filler with no vitamins or minerals. Don’t loose sight of the fact that dogs require a protein-based diet. Gobbling up a loaf of bread, or even a bagel, isn’t going to provide anything other than needless carbs and maybe a slight tummy ache. If you use bread, as an occasional snack, be sure to limit your dog’s portions to small amounts.

Of course, if you know that Fido is intolerant to gluten then never give them any bread.

Canine Obesity & Bread

Even though bread isn’t dangerous in itself, there are many valid reasons not to start providing it. First off, it can be exceptionally high in calories, sugar and carbohydrates. Obviously too much bread, any kind, can cause your dog to start packing on the pounds.

Much like humans, many pets nowadays also face obesity problems which is very unfortunate. Even regular exercise may not be enough to shed the weight bought upon by too much bread consumption over time.

Other Potential Problems

People know bread is mostly filler but there are implications which are less understood as they apply to dogs. You don’t want to feed them too much because it can expand the stomach which may alter their digestive system for the worse.

Feeding bread too often can create a bad habit longer term. This is the case with most foods but a bread dependency in particular is a recipe for an unhealthy and overweight dog.

Some types of breads contain raisins and/or nuts. Serving such a food may seriously poison the family dog since raisins are toxic for them!

When Bread is Appropriate

Homemade breads are more wholesome, healthier and much more preferable to any kind that can be purchased at the stores. Regardless of the type of bread, only small portions are advisable as an occasional treat.

It’s true that some owners give their dogs bread to ease discomfort when they are showing signs of constipation. This may help but there are better options for a constipated dog. In all other scenarios, there’s really no valid reason to provide this food on any kind of regular basis.

What About The Fiber

Quite simply, humans can get small amounts of nutrients from their daily bread but dogs should not partake. The fact that it may be a good source of dietary fiber does not outweigh the many downsides. If you want to supplement your dog’s diet look to chickpeas, oatmeal or something like pumpkin instead. Such foods are far better options for obtaining similar types of nutrients.

Conclusion on Giving Bread

Bread is generally not a good feeding choice for a pet dog. This food is basically devoid of nutritional value and high in carbohydrates. Lots of store bought breads contain unnecessary additives. Fancier kinds may contain ingredients that are dangerous for dogs such as raisins. You can share some plain bread as a treat, when you don’t have anything more suitable, but try not to make a habit of it for your dog’s sake.

  • Was this Article Helpful?
  • YES   NO

Add Your Own Answer to the Question Can Dogs Eat Bread? Below

11 Comments

  1. Joanne
  2. Caron
  3. Husna
    • Renee
    • Patty
  4. Alex
    • Scooby
    • K
      • Renee
      • Cowgurl
        • Laura

Add a New Comment ⇩