Can I Give My Dog Atopica?

Can I Give My Dog Atopica?Atopica is a well-regarded prescription allergy medication that’s designed for both dogs and cats. It works by reducing symptoms associated with common skin allergies.

The use of Atopica can be very effective but it’s also important to document your dog’s symptoms as a way to eventually eliminate the source of such allergies. This information may also be valuable to your vet.

The truth is you really don’t want to medicate your dog for every allergy sign. Owners should turn to Atopica when scratching, itching or gnawing becomes a problem to the point where your canine is making matters worse.

Can I Give My Dog Atopica? Answer: Yes

A veterinarian must prescribe this medication and it’s very effective for treating atopic dermatitis.

They’ll also run some allergy tests to find out whether or not your dog has some specific allergies. This alone can often give you enough information to help your dog before beginning any treatment. Once you know exactly what your dog is allergic to, you may be able to eliminate the source of the problem and avoid the need for any medications.

Proper Dose of Atopica

Your vet will also know the correct Atopica dose for your particular dog. They will consider their size, age, breed and weight before recommending how much and how often you should provide it to them.

There’s simply no way anyone online can offer highly accurate advice to you for your pet dog. Broad dosing instructions are not really recommended for effective Atopica use.

Allergy Screening Beforehand

The allergy screening quiz is a bit funny on the Atopica website. Even if you answer all of the questions in a way that indicates no problems, as in your dog doesn’t have allergies, they still claim your canine may have seasonal allergies. It seems like it’s geared towards getting you to ask your vet for it no matter what the situation.

Take your vet’s objective and expert opinion, rather than trying to self-diagnose your beloved dog.

Natural & Common Sense Ideas

Solving your dog’s problems without the use of drugs is always preferable instead of quickly turning to Atopica. Take some steps to try to end their allergy problems without getting a prescription. First, try to figure out what the allergens are, then remove them from the dog’s environment. If it’s a seasonal blossom that’s causing your dog to itch or sneeze, keep them away from areas where it’s growing.

If it’s an indoor allergy like dust or mold, do a thorough cleaning or consider getting a vacuum like a Shark or a Dyson. These are able to suck up harmful dust and dander. For indoor mold, get a professional to come out and remove it for you. Mold can be especially harmful for both dogs and humans even if you aren’t allergic to it.

More K9 Allergy Tips

Brush your dog off every day to release extra fur that may have allergens on it. Give them frequent baths to make sure that they’re clean and clear of any extra dander. Try to keep up with cleaning their ears on a regular basis.

Further, take them for daily walks which can help rid them of dead skin cells. This will also give them some fresh air so they can clear out their sinuses. These methods are often effective for assisting with allergies. If you haven’t tried them yet, please do so because they’re a better idea than going straight for Atopica medication.

Conclusion on Atopica

Novartis has developed a fairly effective pet medication for treating seasonal allergies. Your dog may benefit from from taking it but they should be properly diagnosed prior to taking this treatment. This is especially true when treating your dog for any serious allergies. Please see a vet first!

In typical cases, and quite often, you can address the source of allergies without having to use Atopica. This medication can indeed work and provide some relief, but you have to go about it in the right way. In the end, your dog will thank you for it!

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{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Wanda September, 2014

My vet has given my 23lb pug 25 mg Benadryl for reactions and allergies to her shots. I also give her 10mg childrens Claritin for Sugar’s nasal congestion and runny nose. I give tablets to her on an almost daily basis in a baby spoon of peanut butter which I substitute for one of her treats.


Emily Bell December, 2012

I was giving my dogs Welactin. One dog, my Bull Mastiff, had terrible skin problems so she is now on Atopica as well. When I ran out of Welactin, her skin cleared up. I wonder if she could be allergic to what is in Welactin, namely Eicosapentaenoic acid and Docosahexaenoic acid?


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