Can I Give My Dog Celery?

Can I Give My Dog Celery?Since celery is such a healthy food, it seems like it’d be a good idea to feed some to the family dog. Being low in calories, high in anti-inflammatory properties and just very nutritious makes it a very tempting snack for Fido.

Celery certainly has a lot going for it but confirming its appropriateness for canines is smart prior to feeding. Whether you are trying to get your dog to lose some weight or you just happen to have some on hand, we’re here to help.

So is this a healthy choice for them or not? In truth, feeding your dog vegetables is not really necessary since they are more carnivorous than us. However, we personally consider celery to be one of the top natural treats and we provide it on occasion.

Can I Give My Dog Celery? Answer: Yes, when properly prepared

Cut it up into small pieces and remove any stringy parts. Do this and you’ve turned celery into a healthy treat that doesn’t carry unnecessary digestive risks.

You can serve raw or cooked celery but, without preparation, this crunchy plant vegetable can present a possible choking hazard. It also can also be difficult to pass when it comes out the other end which is why there’s a little work to do before giving it to your dog. Other than that, much like carrots, you can feed celery to your dog but keep the amount within reason.

There’s a highly regarded all-natural product that incorporates celery and contains no preservatives or additives whatsoever. We sometimes use it as a reward. They are bite-sized celery and carrots with peanut butter and our dogs always go nuts for them!

Why Celery is Healthy

Most people know that celery is a health food but the details reveal that it is absolutely super! Whenever you can combine powerful nutrition with low calories, then you’ve really got something special. The fact that dogs can partake is just icing on the cake.

For one, celery contains many kinds of phytonutrient antioxidants which may good for arthritic dogs. Another benefit is the high amount of fiber, both soluble and insoluble. This helps to prevent diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis and many other diseases. Celery can also help to lower your dog’s blood pressure!

Other Benefits for Fido

Many folks don’t realize that celery may help to fight off cancer. It seems unlikely but that’s what the science suggests. What may be more certain, as it applies to your dog, is that celery contains lots of vitamins such as calcium, amino acids, iron, potassium as well as vitamin A, B and C among others. On top of all that, some owners claim that celery reduces bad doggie breath.

But be realistic and don’t overfeed celery. After all, dogs require meat-based protein and vegetables shouldn’t take on too high of a percentage of their diet.

Preparation & Other Notes

So you’ve found a excellent snack for the family dog. That’s great but please don’t forget that celery can present a choking danger. You want your dog to be able to consume this food safely which is why you really must prepare it beforehand. Be sure to chop the stalks into small pieces so as to avoid any possibility of a blockage during digestion.

Moderation is another key when it comes to this healthy treat. You may see your dog peeing too much if celery consumption is high. Besides, you don’t want to fill them up without receiving the meat based protein they actually do require on a daily basis. So while celery is a good choice, don’t overdo it.

Conclusion on Celery

Just like a few other green vegetables, like steamed broccoli in particular, serving up some celery can be a healthy and beneficial snack for your beloved dog. It definitely packs a lot of a nutritional punch but isn’t so easy to chew up and digest due to the stringiness. For this reason, cut up their portion prior to serving it to them. Also, only provide the stalks and do so in moderation because it cannot replace their regular chow.

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{ 6 comments… read them below or add one }

Celadon9 December, 2014

I just started making my own dog food. I add steamed carrots and celery to her mix of cooked ground chicken and beef. I also add brown rice, flax seed oil, Glucosamine and Chondroitin, brewers yeast and one capsule of kelp for thyroid support. Also, one capsule of Acidophilus to each serving. My vet says this is great!

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Tania December, 2014

I have 2 little dogs and they eat dog food and cooked chicken breast. They also hunt me down for celery! I eat celery on most days and when I do they come running. I pull the stringy parts off since one time my little fella got some stuck in his teeth. They love it and so I share it with them.

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Rhene September, 2013

My dog was, for 3 first months I had her, on the ‘best quality’ most expensive brand I could find, organic. She had dandruff and no shine in her coat! The moment I started cooking for her she regained her shine and dandruff is gone.

I will never believe dog food is any good. It is convenient, but that’s all. Processed and unhealthy! I give her raw pieces of veg like carrots. She loves to chew a big piece when I am at work. She also gets pieces of celery, broccoli and apple.

I put it into her little Kong toys or other things to make it fun. She chews the stuff up quite nicely and doesn’t gulp down big pieces. It’s good to check if you can give your dog something but double check in few places as some stuff is okay in one place and advertised as bad in other.

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Chelsea July, 2013

My vet recommended cucumbers and celery for my dog and she loves it when it’s cut up. It helps her digestive tract. Celery is better than giving dog treats since most are loaded with filth and preservatives.

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Karen April, 2013

If you juice the celery, that should be acceptable because there will be no fiber or strings, right? Trying to give a healthier diet plan.

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Anonymous July, 2013

I’m juicing cucumbers and giving my dogs a tsp daily for hydration. I’m going to do the same with celery and beetroot. I will keep you posted.

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